Student Profile

Gregory Rondot, B.S. Information Technology Student

Gregory Rondot

WGU information technology student, Gregory Rondot, attended the North America Computer Audit, Control and Security (CACS) Conference in Las Vegas at the end of April to receive an award for an extraordinary accomplishment. Gregory tied for earning the highest-ever score in the world on the June 2007 CISM examination.

The intent of this certification is to provide a common body of knowledge for information security management. The exam is made up for 200 multiple choice questions and usually takes four hours to complete. It focuses on information risk management and also includes material on broader issues such as how to govern information security, as well as practical issues such as developing and managing an information security program.

"This award means recognition by my peers internationally and should help me obtain addition consulting work within the industry," said Gregory. "I am passionate about building solutions to peoples' problems and my most rewarding engagements are those when I can develop practical solutions to vexing problems that cost firms time and money and frustrate staff members."

Gregory owns RondoTech Consulting Inc., in Virginia, which provides training and consulting services to owners of small and medium-sized businesses, helping them solve costly IT problems that reduce their firms' profitability. Greg has 15 internationally recognized certifications in IT security, networking, management and HIPPA compliance, yet many firms only recognize a university degree as adequate demonstration of competence in the field.

With that in mind, Gregory decided to pursue a degree. However, being a business owner and a father, he was left with very little time to attend school. After looking through many online degree programs he chose WGU to pursue his bachelor of science in information technology with a security emphasis.

"WGU is uniquely positioned to help active, employed adult students earn a degree based on skills learned in their personal and professional lives," said Gregory. "In my first term I completed 47 units which would equal three to four standard semesters of college work at a traditional school. No other program would have permitted me to move this quickly through my degree program."