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3 Tips for Finding Summer Jobs for Teachers

A teacher works in a greenhouse.

There are a lot of benefits to taking a summer teaching job. If you're a new teacher, it can help you gain experience as well as get your foot in the door. If you're already employed during the school year, then it can help you make some extra money and stay busy. Whatever your reasoning, there are a lot of resources to help you find the best summer jobs for teachers—you just have to know where to look. Here are a few tips to help you find and land a summer job.

 

Put Your Best Face Forward

Before you even start looking for a summer job, you need to make sure that your teaching portfolio and resume are up-to-date. Your portfolio should reflect all of your most recent work. If you're just getting out of college and this job will be your first real experience in the classroom, your portfolio should include lessons and photographs from student teaching, as well as your degree and letters of recommendation.

If you've already been in the game for a while, in addition to lessons and photos from your current work experience, you can include any past and current certifications you hold. Try and add some of your favorite pieces of your students' work too; I've found that prospective employers really like that. I also like adding a table of contents to help potential employers quickly find what they're looking for as they look through my portfolio.

Make sure that your resume is updated to include the following four qualifiers: identification, certification, education, and experience. It's also wise to have an online resume or personal website that has your resume and contact information on it. This will help you stand out because it shows potential employees that you're comfortable with technology.

Search in the Right Places

The first place to find summer jobs for teachers is the school where you currently work. Go to the main office or the teachers lounge to see what job positions they might be offering for the summer months. You can also check your school district's website to see what positions they have available for the summer. When I was looking for a summer job after substituting in a particular school district, I was told to check their website for opportunities. I found many job postings on the site, so I highly recommend giving that a try.

If you're still in college or have just graduated, search your campus career website for these job listings. Many schools offer paid summer internships to qualified teaching candidates. That's how I got my first real teaching experience. After I graduated, I found a paid internship and worked all summer as a teacher's assistant. I gained so much knowledge at the hands of a great mentor, and the following year, I was asked to teach a summer school class.

Beyond that, the best place to find summer jobs for teachers is an online job board. Sites like Indeed, School Spring, and Monster post teaching job listings that you can search for in your area. Most of the sites allow you to post your resume for consideration and to apply for specific opportunities right online.

Consider Alternative Teaching Options

While teaching summer school is a great way to gain experience, as well as make some extra money to put into your pocket, you must keep in mind that the summer school positions usually get offered to veteran teachers before they are posted for the public. So, if you don't have the experience required, you may need to consider some alternative teaching options for summer employment.

For example, tutoring, working at a day care or summer youth program, or writing for a teaching website are all possible alternatives to utilize your degree in the summer months. All of these jobs are usually quite easy to get, well-paying, and flexible, so you're able to enjoy your summer as well. When I was just out of college, I worked for a tutoring company; the hours and pay were great, and I was able to gain relevant job experience.

Taking on a summer job is a great way to keep your mind sharp while gaining some extra cash and experience. Keep in mind that these jobs tend to go fast, so if you know you want to keep working through the summer months, it's best to start your search as soon as possible.